Sex worker Alice Little. Picture: Moonlight Bunny Ranch
Sex worker Alice Little. Picture: Moonlight Bunny Ranch

$1 million-a-year sex worker spills

A SEX worker who brings in more than $1 million a year has given a detailed insight into a week in her life at Nevada's Moonlite Bunny Ranch.

Alice Little, who bills herself as America's "highest earning sex worker", wrote in a piece for Refinery29's Money Diaries she typically takes home "mid six-figures" after the legal brothel takes 50 per cent of her bookings.

"My first year, I booked $US511,000, pocketing half of that as my income pre-expenses," she said.

"My second year, I booked $US712,000, and I'm on track to book $US1.2 million for 2018."

Little outlined her weekly routine, tracking her daily expenses and bookings, which can range from $US2500 for a "basic experience to as high as $US22,500 for an "overnight experience".

In addition to paying $US1000 a month for rent and putting away $US20,000 a month in savings and investments, she revealed that this year she hired a $US3000-a-month full-time assistant for a "to act as a second set of hands".

"She helps with my podcast, my YouTube morning show, taking photos, animal care. With her help, I've been able to focus on creating all kinds of new media for my guests to enjoy," she writes.

A typical day starts with exercise and looking after her two dogs Imriel and Anubis.

"I go to my pilates class and then have breakfast and take care of the animals at home afterward," she writes.

"I have a larger appointment to prepare for, so I begin getting ready around 11am so I can be at the ranch 30 minutes before I'm supposed to meet them. I always like to be there before my guest arrives, as I love nothing more than to be the first person someone sees when they come through the front door!"

She describes meeting the guest, "who is very excited about losing their virginity".

"We discuss taking photos together throughout our date, so they have a special memory of their first time to look back on fondly," she writes.

"Book all-day experience for $US15,000. Amount earned: $US7,500. This booking brought me up to $US1 million for the year. 10pm, I return home, very tired, and head to bed to get some much needed rest."

She also addresses controversial Bunny Ranch owner Dennis Hof, who this week was elected to the Nevada State Assembly - despite being dead.

Mr Hof, a Republican and supporter of US President Donald Trump, died last month shortly after having sex with one of his workers to celebrate his 72nd birthday.

It was too late to remove him from the ballot and Nevada voters still selected him, despite widespread coverage and posters at polling stations detailing his death.

"There are a lot of Republicans who were uncomfortable voting for Dennis because of the nature of his business, and they now know that he is not the one who will be serving," his campaign manager Chuck Muth told Reuters.

"They will feel much more comfortable casting the ballot for him knowing there will be another Republican to replace him."

Little said when she received the phone call about Hof's death she was "stunned and at a complete loss for words".

"I send a quick text to my assistant to let her know what has happened, and ask her to make some phone calls to arrange for grief counsellors to come by the ranches," she writes.

"Many people don't realise this, but the Bunny Ranch is run like a family company - so many of us were very close to Dennis and considered him to be so much more than just our boss. He was a friend, a mentor, and a role model."

Many readers were unhappy with her comments. Hof had faced three separate accusations of rape and abuse by former workers who came forward earlier this year. At the time, Hof dismissed the allegations as "absurd".

"From my understanding, he was not a nice man, and this is akin to a female actress mourning the death of Harvey Weinstein," one reader wrote.

Another said: "This seemed like a really icky way to whitewash a business owned and run by a terrible, terrible man. Alice seems lovely, but supporting a Trump-loving alleged rapist is not so lovely."

Little replied that in three years working there she had "never (witnessed), seen or experienced anything close" to the allegations.

"Dennis treated me with nothing but respect," she wrote.

"Having spoken to countless ladies over the years that have worked for Dennis, no one has ever reported behaviour even remotely resembling what (is) being claimed."

That didn't go down well. "This attitude is terrible and why women don't report, so I am not exactly surprised that no one has told you about bad behaviour," one reader wrote.

"Surely you can envision a world where terrible things happen to others even if they don't happen to you personally. Believing victims is an important first step."